Facts about Tabata

Today, I’m opening the floor up to a guest post about an unusual, innovative style of fitness training called Tabata. Enjoy!

If you thought an hour or even half an hour of aerobic exercise was a good way to lose weight and to stay fit, then here’s some four-minute news.

Tabata. Tabata is a four minute fat burnout workout. It increases your aerobic and anaerobic capacity in a no-nonsense way. And what’s more, it increases your resting metabolic rate. A workout that helps your body burn fat even while it is at rest! Tabata really gets those cells up and awake.

Tabata was created by a Japanese man, Izumi Tabata. He tested this high intensity interval training on a group of athletes and found that their metabolic rates improved vastly in comparison with those who adopted a moderate workout. Eventually this is supposed to make you stronger. A word of caution here – Tabata is for advanced exercisers, not for beginners.

You can design your own Tabata. The principle is intensive exercise with intervals. You could use dumb-bells or presses – whatever works for you; and I cannot caution enough here that do listen to your body. There are numbers of videos to help you decide which form of Tabata to use, if you like.

Basically: you can design your own Tabata workout, starting with what you can do with a little effort and then going on to the more strenuous. The aim is to maximize the four minutes of exercise. You should be physically and mentally capable of seeing yourself through eight rigorous cycles of your chosen exercise in the four minutes. If you have to ease off from the exercise often, then choose lighter weights or something – anything that helps you to complete the cycle.

Your body is unique; what works for one may not work for another. The before and after photographs of someone who went from flab to fab is not the correct reason to choose a particular Tabata workout.

The body is never at rest. To power up or power down you jog or jump a little. The actual workout is a legs-apart, anti gravity high jump. It gets you sweating in a few minutes. Those jumps can take a toll of the knees of those on the other side of forty, so I would suggest easing oneself into it, with a lot of regard for the knees.

You have to choose the type of workout depending on what you want from your body. Burn fat? Develop abs? Increase your endurance? What? You can choose from skipping, burpees, crunches, sprints, etc.

Adhere scrupulously to the 20 second-workout-10- second –rest routine in your four minute cycle. Anything more or less might cause a cramp or pull a muscle. Do not ignore this. Also, it would disturb the warm up/cool down mechanism. There are Apps and videos to help you time yourself, but really, a simple stop watch would do, or even maintaining a count of 1 to 20.

After the first day, your muscles will protest at the rigor you have put them through. You would be well advised to rest the next day. Make sure that you also have the right nutrition. A diet that is high on energy is recommended. Eat before and after your Tabata workout. Rest and nutritional plans are important, too when trying our Tabata.

Author Bio

I’m Ramya Raju, a freelance writer/web designer from India. I write on varied topics like English Courses, SEO, Web Design, Mobile, Marketing etc. I have an experience of about 8 years in content writing and have worked for top blogs and websites. I’m generally an extrovert; I like photography, anthropology and traveling to different countries to learn the culture and living of the local inhabitants.
Contact:

ramyaraju896@gmail.com

http://www.englishcourses.pro/courses/intensive-english-courses/

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3 thoughts on “Facts about Tabata

  1. I love Tabatas and so do my clients :)! They are such a great way to really get the heart rate up and challenge the body in a variety of environments. I myself did sprint intervals today rather than my standard 20 min run…time went by so much faster and I felt as though I got so much work at the end!

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