Miss Alexandrina

The thinking-space of a not-quite novelist


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Is There A Knack To Writing (Steampunk)?

Credit to Cait, because I can’t art like she can.

Credit to Cait, because I can’t art like she can.

Well, actually I’m writing a novella*.

Academic work has been tough lately – getting on top of things. I was chatting to my boyfriend, whose weeks consist of 9-5s or similar days in work; whilst mine are few in contact, as I listed the things I have to do today (writing a blog post notwithstanding), I realised that I have so much yet to do as the term wears on.

So, before I go on, here’s a video of Hank Green giving tips on how to do all the things (If you’ve not watched How To Adult before, I highly recommend it).

Anyway, where were we? Ah, Steampunk. Much-talked-about topic if you search the internet. I don’t know how much it’s been talked about how to write steampunk, though. I’ve not searched. But Steampunk is the easiest genre for me to write when I need to write in the midst of academic work – I realised at the weekend that it’s what the inside of my brain looks like: shiny things, science, long frilly dresses, and magic.

But is it the easiest? A good example of judging the quality of prose is whether it can be smoothly performed or read aloud. At the Surrey Steampunk convivial last Sunday gone, I had the pleasure of listening to a steampunk short story and a snippet of a steampunk-esque biopic-esque play. What I noticed most was the wonderfully sprightly prose characteristic of steampunk.

It made my writing feel dangerously inadequate.

The problem (at least, I’ve found with WTCB) is that my first draft are needlessly florid. To deal with this, editing has concentrated on removing overwriting – but, with that, I’ve lost…something. Some shininess in steampunk written voice and style.

Do I have any tips from what I’ve learnt? Well, part of steampunk is that it’s each to their own – so, if you want to develop the satire or humour element of steampunk, you’ll be using a different tone of language to if you’re painting a work of elegant structures and grand societies in steampunk.

> There is different slang, different vocab, and different self-concept in the Victorian area. Part of the quirk (and hook) of steampunk is the oft-elaborate and dialogue.

> Antiquated whimsy. In the same vein of thought, steampunk has a certain element or pizazz to its specific genre that other genres won’t or don’t (need to) include.

> The world. Writing a fantasy world is no mean feat, certainly, but it at least has some kind of ready template of an expected map; writing a steampunk landscape is a combination of the rusty, oily mechanics and the lush, greenery better found in Tolkien.

> Following on from that, don’t be afraid to be inspired by what you see around you. Write what you know, and if that’s the soft colours of your garden or the colder colours of your bathroom or study or something completely out of the usual, then that’s the perfect inspiration for a realistic setting.

> The characters. Some steampunk (particularly if utilising satire or humour) applies stereotypes or types to characters: the wacky scientist, the aristocratic elder, the tough air pirate.

Of course, I would never advise of writing a stereotype, but they are a place to start. This allows readers who know steampunk and its umbrella/links to connect with the characters and types they know.

> There is still a story and plot in the glamour and soot. Despite what I’ve said, you cannot forfeit a good, well-woven plot for beautiful and elaborate or complex prose. Balance is crucial, and, yes – balance is difficult.

Of course, there are so many different ways to tackle writing steampunk, and, as we any genre, each writing has their own, personal tactics. Me? I’m going to be reading more Shakespeare, after finding that it conjures up images and characters bright to my imagination. I’m also going to be searching our more ethereal harp music like this sonatina. I don’t tend to write with music, but some draw for me.

The verdict? Steampunk, like every other genre of writing, is difficult. But don’t despair! There are ways of working on it! :P

*Well, actually, since writing the first draft of this post, I’ve started writing another novel, as well.


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7 Quick Takes: Shakespeare, Swing, Subjectivity Research

The busyness of my weeks barely permit me to have time to write a post, and I’m squeezing in each as I go, stealing spare pennies.

7 Quick Takes Friday is hosted by Kelly of This Ain’t the Lyceum.

seven quick take friday 2

~1~

As usual, I start with the work. I’ve been doing research for my third year project, which is likely going to be something along the lines of investigating how types of language can change people’s perception of the world and objects.

Subjectivity is weird.

~2~

On the leisure side, we had so much dancing this week. Saturday was the Swing Jam social as I mentioned on Monday. Looking through my photos, I didn’t manage to get so many clean-cut and precise ones as I would’ve liked, so I will have to stay dictating to you the fun I had that evening.

~3~

Thursday we went to see jazz band The Silver Heels and swing dance to them in a local bar venue. More great fun, especially as so many of the society turned up, and we said goodbye to President Chris as he goes to Cyprus on army business! We were told that if as many dancers arrive next month (Silver Heels is a monthly gig, and God bless everyone for that!), they’ll move the sofa and budge the tables to give us a bigger dancing space, yay! I don’t have a visual clip of The Silver Heels’ work, as normally they’re being listened and danced to, but their Reverbnation page has a nice selection of their songs and covers.

~4~

The Annual General Meeting has been on my mind as the committee prepares for it, and I have to compile a list of things that have been and need to be done. I’m working on it, and, actually, the more thought and confidence I let God provide me, the easier I’m finding it being. I have come to realise that too long has come to pass of me letting others speak first when I have an idea. I must not suppress my ideas any more, for the suppression is what lack of confidence has taken me from my dreams.

~5~

A rehearsal picture from the official Facebook page

 

I went to see the Reading Drama Society’s The Tempest this evening. It was wonderful, but what struck me the most was not the lively costumes and makeup, the amazing direction, or the creative acting, but the music, dazzling and heartbreaking. I would love to return to the theatre, and, in particular, back to theatrical music. I have a start in just listening as I work, I guess…

~6~

And as I sit here with my tea and thoughts a-brewing, the fiction practically writes itself. I don’t know if I mentioned before my inspiration of A City of Ember, but that has been stirring, and, as I watched my friends and thespians perform, I saw the characters beyond them, I saw the players be my hands and take to me my work.

And that is inspiration.

~7~

Alchemist siblings Brielle and Pierre

Alchemist siblings Brielle and Pierre


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TCWT: From Classical to Alternative – What Music Fuels Me?

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Since I’ve never been late for a Teens Can Write, Too! post (though, I am sad to mar my record), I think we can let me off that I’m a day late on the schedule. And I’ll see what I can do with my busy bee status. And the irony is that this is one of my favourite prompts. I love the idea of links because music and writing. February’s blog chain prompt is “How does music relate to your writing?”

And, actually, the straight answer to that is extremely. Right off the bat, music relates so much to my writing, by the sheer fact that I ‘gave up’ writing music and lyrics to write books. Moving from one full-time hobby to another full-time hobby, as it were.

But how does music relate to my writing? As in – how is my writing affected by the types of music I listen to? I may be in the minority by not listening to music (with lyrics) as I write, as that throws me away from my mental prose, and I don’t tend to devise a playlist for my novels as some authors have done.* I don’t really feel that there are songs that completely accomplish what I need for writing scenes, characters, and settings; they are two different mediums, after all. We may be able to paint scene with words and with music, to depict emotions, feelings, and humanity through those, but they cannot be analogous.

Though, instead of a playlist, I think it would be quite fun to compile a hypothetical film soundtrack to a novel. But then, that’s me, and I work via visuals in my mind. To me, most of what I read and write is a film anyway.

Nevertheless, I do use music to help my writing. And that’s in editing. There’s something about having music running in the background that kick-starts my mind into writing and concentrating mode. In fact, I’m currently listening to Silent Movie by Frenchy and the Punk as I write this post. Before then, I’d been feeling in a slump, but now I feel like writing again. Of course, this wouldn’t be a post about music without me including some YouTube! This one’s the fun House of Cards ’cause there isn’t a video for Silent Movie on YouTube.

The thing is I couldn’t tell you what sort of genre of music most helps me edit. There are occasions where my music lingers into the classical – for who can resist at the call of Elgar and Vagner? Something dramatic. It’s likely I’ll be editing the fight and shouty scenes (and any other conflicts). There is nothing quite like the rousing organ and an entire or orchestral set to bring one’s writing and the exact set of what needs to be edited to mind. I don’t really have a favourite classical (as opposed to choral: Bach) composer. Anything than writing inspired goes.

Then you’ve got the atmospheric music. The alternate stuff. The tools of my trade: the steampunk** music.

This collection of steampunk songs that were my first dipping my toe into that region. Through them, I found Steam Powered Giraffe, fell in love, recovered from a broken mind, found myself, and, uh, fell in love.

It’s a long story.

There are a lot of good songs missing from this playlist, of course, but it has the ‘hits’ of the bigger bands (most of them US bands). And the original version of SPG’s Brass Goggles with soprano Upgrade. Abney Park are worth a further check out if you like the punk and heavier side of steampunk music. I have the pleasure of seeing them live next term.

**I am aware not every writer on the chain will know Steampunk, the alternative-history sub of SFF, but it wouldn’t be for me to explain it here. I’ve spoken about it before (I even have a category now!) and quoted various figures. Those of you who are Steampunks, do tell, so we can flail together.

*Except for Of Jackets and Phones, the playlist of which I created for its fifth birthday, and is embedded below.

In summary:

I don’t write to music, but I do edit to it, particularly if it’s something atmospheric like steampunk. I don’t have a favourite genre of music to do writing stuff to, and have been known to play from my speakers the craziness of alternative music, the grace of classical and jazz, and the typicalities of mainstream music.

This is such an interesting topic. It appeals to my Psychology degree, in that we can see through observation the types of behavioural and emotional changes that occur when listening to music, writing inspiration and progress (for me) being one of those behaviours. There have indeed been studies on the possible correlations between music and mood, not to mention that even listening to music can release endorphins (one of the ‘happy drugs’ or small-molecule neurotransmitters in our brains).

If you’re not a part of the blog chain, I’d say you should still read through the other days and see what other participants have said.

6thhttp://jasperlindell.blogspot.com/ and http://vergeofexisting.wordpress.com/

7thhttp://novelexemplar.wordpress.com/

8thhttp://www.juliathewritergirl.com/

9thhttp://www.freeasagirlwithwings.wordpress.com/

10thhttps://ramblingsofaravis.wordpress.com/

11thhttp://butterfliesoftheimagination.wordpress.com/ andhttp://www.pamelanicolewrites.com/

12thhttp://randommorbidinsanity.blogspot.com/

13thhttp://miriamjoywrites.com/ andhttp://whileishouldbedoingprecal.weebly.com/

14thhttp://kirabudge.weebly.com/

15thhttp://lillianmwoodall.wordpress.com/ andhttp://erinkenobi2893.wordpress.com/

16thhttp://theedfiles.blogspot.com/ andhttp://fantasiesofapockethuman.blogspot.com/

17thhttp://irisbloomsblog.wordpress.com/ andhttp://musingsfromnevillesnavel.wordpress.com/

18thhttp://semilegacy.blogspot.com/ and http://from-stacy.blogspot.com/

19thhttp://horsfeathersblog.wordpress.com/

20thhttps://clockworkdesires.wordpress.com/

21sthttps://stayandwatchthestars.wordpress.com/ andhttp://arielkalati.blogspot.com/

22ndhttp://loonyliterate.com/ andhttps://www.mirrormadeofwords.wordpress.com/

23rdhttp://unikkelyfe.wordpress.com/

24thhttp://themagicviolinist.blogspot.com/ andhttp://allisonthewriter.wordpress.com/

25thhttps://missalexandrinabrant.wordpress.com/ <<you were here…yesterday>>

26thhttp://awritersfaith.blogspot.com/ andhttp://thelonglifeofalifelongfangirl.wordpress.com/

27thhttp://nasrielsfanfics.wordpress.com/ andhttp://thelittleenginethatcouldnt.wordpress.com/

28th – https://teenscanwritetoo.wordpress.com/ (We’ll announce the topic for next month’s chain.)


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‘Losing It’ is Out

(Pun totally intended. ;) ) Okay, the official release date for the collection of steamy short stories by various NA and YA authors was released yesterday (11.02.15), but I…may have forgotten, sorry! :P

Dat cover guy… :P

LosingIt_Cover_Final_R22 Bestselling YA authors reveal what went on behind the curtain in your favorite YA novels! From paranormal to contemporary, this collection features over 200 pages of ALL NEW CONTENT full of deleted scenes, extended endings, and more from the young adult series’ you love. 

In this YA/NA crossover collection, all of your favorite heroines are cashing in their VCards! YA just got steamy, sexy, and not afraid to go all the way!

Due to the graphic nature of some content, this collection is recommended strictly for mature readers. 

Stories include excerpts and extended material—ALL NEW CONTENT—featuring the following YA novels & authors:

The Grimoire Saga by SM Boyce

The Death Series by Tamara Rose Blodgett

Penny Black Trilogy by Stacey Wallace Benefiel

Dirty Blood series by Heather Hildenbrand

The Mythology Series by Helen Boswell

Stories About Melissa Series by Bethany Lopez

Keegan’s Chronicles by Julia Crane

The Tate Chronicles by K.A. Last

Fragile Creatures by Kristina Circelli

The Spellbound Trilogy by Nikki Jefford

Judgement of the Six Series by Melissa Haag

A Dark Faerie Tale Series by Alexia Purdy

The Double Threat Series by Julie Prestsater

The Elsker Saga by S.T. Bende

Ovialell Series by Tish Thawer

The Runes Series by Ednah Walters

The Cornerstone Series by Misty Provencher

The Waiting Series by Ginger Scott

Forged Series by A.O. Peart

The Arotas Series by Amy Miles

Funeral Crashing Mysteries by Milda Harris

The Wolf Trilogy by M.R. Polish

~

Want to know what it was like for these YA authors to write the dirty details?

Hop on over to their blogs and find out! Hear about their “firsts” writing the sexy scenes and get entered to win paperbacks from each and other awesome prizes! The full schedule and participating sites can be found here (through 2/18/15).

LosingIt_BlogHop

22 Shades of Virginity…

Join all of the authors for a special Twitter chat on Thursday, Feb 11 from 7-9pm. Come hang and get all of your burning questions answered! Ask us anything and don’t forget to use: #VCARD

twitter party

Interested? I know I am. There are some great indie authors in this pack. Losing It is available now. To buy:

Amazon US
Amazon UK
Barnes & Noble
iBooks
Kobo


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Beautiful People: The Valentine’s Edition

(Far be it for me to dictate against inspiration from commercialism…) For this month’s Beautiful People, hosted by Cait and Sky, since it’s February, they decided to do a Valentine’s edition and look at significant relationships of these beautiful people/characters.

I made it Valentine's pretty ^_^

I made it Valentine’s pretty ^_^

I would be insane not to look at Aidelle and Phillip, and, unsurprisingly, I have a lot to say! Theirs is one of the most interesting relationships in my writing – not least because the existence and ‘fates’ of certain other characters hinges on their being together. It’s also one of the more successful relationships, at least in relative terms. Oh, and FYI, since the trilogy has a lot of timey-wimey, I’ll be looking at their relationship at the time of the beginning of WTCB, aka August 2010, the first…

snapshot_fde225f2_1de25398

  1. How long have they been a couple?

About a year. I’m sure The Almanac has the exact date they met and were obliged to be a couple, but I don’t know exactly, except that they have been engaged for a year.

  1. How did they first meet?

Through The Continent’s arranged marriage system: Phillip had to choose a wife to appease his parents from a Selection of ten women; Aidelle agreed to have her name put forward, so her mother would get off her back. She had no idea Phillip would actually go for the least socialite-y of the girls. Luckily, it worked out for them. (Thus far.)

  1. What were their first thoughts of each other? (Love at first sight or “you’re freakishly annoying”?)

Hum, well, it wasn’t love at first sight and neither of them wanted to meet, so there was some tension there, but they certainly had a dash of chemistry, and were intellectually compatible – ironically, by the fact that neither of them wanted to be there.

  1. What do they do that most annoys each other?

Aidelle hates that Phillip doesn’t raise his voice when he gets angry. She doesn’t like that he keeps things from her, acting aloof and the like, even if for her own sake. Phillip loves Aidelle very much, but he can be annoyed by the way she always complains about her siblings and his. They don’t much yet have habits that really irk each other.

  1. Are their personalities opposite or similar?

More complementary than similar. Whilst they share the same views about life, such as that the war is bad, Aidelle runs on tempers to Phillip’s logical contemplation. He is thoughtful, though they are similarly emotion- and action-focused to trouble. However, Phillip has known that his fury can hurt, and has changed his actions to make the world a better place. Maybe Aidelle will learn from losing her temper than she needs to regulate her mood better.

  1. How would their lives be different without each other?

Oh, this question… You must’ve read my novel! :P Whilst if she’d never met Phillip, Aidelle would still be the youngest, frumpiest third daughter of failing parents, Phillip would always have had to choose a woman to marry, lest he face the wrath and pressure of his father’s inheritance. He probably would never have been attracted to her, and who knows if he would have ever wanted a family? His entire future would have been completely different if he had not chosen Aidelle. Perhaps, that’s why I find Phillip a more interesting character to write.

  1. Are they ever embarrassed of each other?

I think Phillip probably feels rather shy of Aidelle when she interacts with the papers and possibly with his family. On the other hand, they tend to be quite open with each other; because they have similar ideas and strict unspoken relationship norms, they don’t tend to be embarrassed by each other.

  1. Does anyone disapprove of their relationship?

All of the people. *cough* Well, Aidelle’s family approve of the relationship, because it’s a socioeconomic step up for her, orchestrated by her mother (and possibly manipulated by Aidelle’s uncle who was once the hired painter for Phillip’s parents, but the jury’s out on that one); but Phillip’s parents, once he had selected Aidelle, started having second thoughts about whether she is the best woman to be a Costello wife. We’re not sure who started the rumours against Aidelle’s anti-societism and how flawed and failing her poor parents are. And then there are the socialites with deep jealousy who despise and bully Aidelle whenever she is in the centre of the continent. Perhaps they think if they insult her enough, she will relinquish Phillip and let him marry one of them instead.

And then there’s his brother Rion, who just hates the general idea of marrying women. I wonder why… ;)

  1. Do they see their relationship as long-term/leading to marriage?

They are engaged! *drinks celebratory wine* In fact, they are due to marry a month after the novel starts, so, yeah, they want their happily ever after.

  1. If they could plan the “perfect outing” together, where would they go?

I could see them going for a walk around the lake where they met. They’d take a picnic into the bandstand, then later find a nice quiet spot in the woods. ;) Both Phillip and Aidelle, whilst not being athletic, enjoy exploring nature and hiking, though Aidelle would probably start complaining that her feet are hurting after a while. She doesn’t have the best of shoes for serious hiking.

snapshot_fde225f2_1de25381

That’s it from me for now. I could talk about Aidelle and Phillip’s relationship for ages, going through every little detail of the past, present, future— but that’s what the Almanac is for, not me. Check out the rest of the Beautiful People for February tag. Following on from Cait’s question at the end of her post, I’ll say that I write fluffy romances with a hint of the tragic, of course, a smidgen forbidden by some, and occasionally a triangle if the characters feel like it.

What about you? Do you write romance? If so, what sort? Happy February!


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Writing Is Really Rather Odd Sometimes

I’ve been going through a writing dry spell at the moment. I find I can’t devote my mind to writing even a page when I have to turn off all those instincts to concentrate on my lecture and seminar content. It’s not the course-work: that’s the easy bit when I have my own space and own time to create, where I can also slip in some creative writing. It’s the time I devote to thinking about my topics, and that is a little bit of a shame.

However, after and during dancing yesterday, I had a bit of an idea about developing a rewrite of WTCB, to make the fight occur earlier in the novel. I have no idea if this is the way to go, or if I’m simply pulling the action far closer than it needs to be, with less build-up. There is even a part of me rebelling, because three chapters was a good, even number, and left a nice gap after the fight. But do so I must for the sake of the novel. Besides, the war still occurs between chapters three and four, so, chronologically, we are rolling in the same direction.

It’s so easy to write this new scene. To have the characters act the way they should. But it makes me wonder: why does going back to WTCB (lovingly titled ‘The Novel’ amongst my friends) feel much like slipping on an old shoe, whilst trying to craft something new, even steampunk of a similar world to The Continent feel like I am forever sticking my fingers into nowhere-glue?

I have an idea: characters and their depth. After all, it might be said that plot evolves out of characters; we cannot force our characters into situations that are nothing to do with them. I know nothing of the new characters I encounter – the contemporary, familiar setting of Jess and Laurie’s university oddly does not ring true; and even Amelia’s alt-history adventures in Egypt have yet to fit entirely into place. Yet, I can fold back into the tragedy of Aidelle and Phillip so easily.

My writing inspiration has returned in the form of my characters themselves. I see Phillip and Rion, walking away from Aidelle and towards the war, pressing through their familiar landscape. I haven’t entirely got the chapter planned out to each and every movement, but there is currently something of a progression, some action, some conflict, and some dialogue, and I’m still deciding how much symbolism and foreshadowing to include, but, for the moment, I’m looking forward to just…writing, something I’ve not been able to do so streamlined for a while.

Writing is really rather odd sometimes.


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The Inside Out Book Tag

The illuminous (no, I don’t know if that’s a word, either) NevilleGirl tagged me in this INSIDE-OUT book tag, where the first letter of each question spells out inside-out, the way we see and experience books. I’ve been reading more recently, so thinking about the aesthetic comes at the right time for me. Plus, these are some different questions than specific books. I like that variety!

 

I

Inside flap / Back-of-the-book summaries: Too much info? Or not enough?

I tend to find that there is not enough info for me. Sometimes, I’ll pick up a book because of its blurb, and find that it starts in a completely different place to that which I expected. Or, it quickly rushes past the inciting incident made a big problem in the blurb, and rockets on to a completely different story. Normally, this is not my cup of chai.

N

 

New book: What form do you want it in? Be honest: audio book, e-book, paperback, or hardcover?

I think I have listened to literally three audio-books in my life, so not that. I just never listen to them. Personally, my favourite out of those listed is the glorious hardback. I just love holding in my hands such a large and tough book. There’s not much that can wreck a hardback! Of the nine Skulduggery Pleasant books (the main ones, anyway), I have five in hardback and only two in paperback (I borrowed book1 and book3 from the library). They’re shiny and prettier than the paperbacks.

I’m still not a big fan of the ebook, so I would always choose paperback over that; there’s just something about having a physical book, weighing it up, knowing in pure pages how much longer there is to read…

I could go on dreamily.

S

Scribble while you read? Do you like to write in your books, taking notes, making comments, or do you keep your books clean clean clean?

Do people do this for fiction, too? The only times I’ve ever written in books – with pencil, mind – is if I’m making notes for an essay [non-fiction] or to underline amazing writing or imagery of which I’m jealous [fiction]. I’d never make notes in an actual book!

I

In your best voice, read for us your favorite first sentence from a book.

*clears throat*

I don’t have a favourite first line – it changes with my mood and the genres I read – but here’s something you might recognise:

“If you are interested in stories with happy endings, you would be better off reading some other book. In this book, not only is there no happy ending, there is no happy beginning and very few happy things in the middle.”

Lemony Snicket, A Bad Beginning. I’m currently reading Snicket’s new series All The Wrong Questions. Snicket does a brilliant post-modern writing – as I’ve said before, I don’t normally like post-modernism, but my attention was captured by such a well-crafted first line.

Being a fan of the long-winded (!), I actually really rather like Dickens’ “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times…”, even though that first line is literally a paragraph long! I feel it sets the scene well, and is actually rather a clever look at how society is split – a theme strong throughout the novel.

D

Does it matter to you whether the author is male or female when you’re deciding on a book? What if you’re unsure of the author’s gender?

Nope. Often I don’t look at an author until after I’ve started or even finished reading. What always matters is the quality of the writing, not the writer themselves (unless they’ve done something worthy of scandal or against my morals).

E

Ever read ahead? Or have you ever read the last page way before you got there?

I won’t lie – I used to. Not deliberately, but I did like to see how long the book was, and sometimes I liked to catch the last line – like a first line, it doesn’t necessarily reveal plot, but it says something about the book and is often clever or sophisticated. With ebooks, of course, this is a lot less easy to do; and I’ve broken out of the habit of reading ahead nowadays.

O

Organized bookshelves, or outrageous bookshelves?

Organised! All the way. If you know me, you’ll know that organisation is my middle name. ;) My bookcases are no different. They are, surprisingly, not sorted alphabetically, but by author (eg. all the Jacqueline Wilsons, Lemony Snickets, Harry Potters.) and often with genre included, too.

U

Under oath: Have you ever bought a book based on the cover alone?

Yes: I do it frequently. Covers are the first things I will see, and being so picky about them has its advantages that I’m picky about the types of novels I end up picking up. I like pretty covers as long as they’re original. Give me something that sticks out when I see it in a bookshop.

T

Take it outside to read, or stay in?

Probably stay inside. It depends on the weather – and it Britain, that is always a problem. I don’t want rain getting on my paperbacks, and nor do I want the sun to reflect off their white pages and get in my eyes, halting me in my reading. On the other hand, whilst I do like a sofa or a comfy chair in which to do my reading, I’m also a fan of those classic outside-on-the-green moments, book in one hand, lemonade in the other, warmed from the outside.

Those are my answers! I am tagging a couple of people:

Lillie @ LillianMWoodall

Jae @ Litandscribbles

Heidi and Kati @ MysticCooking

Yawatta @ Yawatta Hosby

And anybody else who feels like doing this tag. It’s a lot of fun – as I said, a bit different from the usual reading/book tags. Alex out. :D

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