Beautiful People: H’s Cathy

*gasp* What is this, an actual Beautiful People post on my blog in 2016? I know, I’ve been as lax in keeping up with the writing tag as a printer sans ink, partly because I’ve not tackled any new big novels for a while and instead have been trying to focus on the importance of editing. But since I’m working on it at the moment, about two years from its conclusion, I thought we’d revisit my Steampunk novel H, a tale of ghosts, Italian tribes, and dirigibles.

what is beautiful peple about

Beautiful People is a monthly segment focusing on the fictional people of our novels with the intent of uncovering their little tidbits that although may not come into fruition or play in the novel, round the character into more than a paper cutout. It is hosted by Cait at Paper Fury and Sky from Further Up and Further In.

So, let me once again, introduce you to the lovely, yet audacious, Miss Cathleen Cattoway, betrothed to Squire Alexander Sterling. Or so she hopes…

PAPERFURY

  1. How did you come up with this character?

Horology - CathleenLike most of my character creation, I don’t recall coming up with Cathleen Cattoway specifically. I know I wanted a female main character to look through, someone with brown hair and eyes as a template for her appearance. Confident and not docile to the sexism of the day, but not someone who liked mechanics. Her name was something of a pick-out-the-hat, as I tend to do. It stuck, thank goodness.

  1. Have they ever been starving? Why? And what did they eat to break the fast?

Totally boring here, but no. She’s had to be self-sufficient, and she has been hungry, sure, but never starving.

  1. Do they have a talent or skill that they’re proud of?

Linguistics. That is, the study of language structure. Cathy’s particular speciality comes from translating Latin and Greek, and so she is fascinated by how different languages use different syntax to create different meaning. This also helps her pick out when people are not being so truthful—as she is more likely to hear the false way they are using language.

4. List 3 things that would make them lose their temper.

People thinking she has to need help.

People stopping her from reaching her potential or helping others.

Liars, because she can read them more easily than most.

5. What is their favourite type of weather? Least favourite?

Does nighttime count as a weather? I guess that’s cheating. 😛 Cathy’s favourite time of weather would be blue skies, though not too hot. Her least favourite? Thunderstorm rain.

  1. What is their Hogwarts house and/or MBTI personality?

I went with Hogwarts house because, although I’ve done numerous Meyers-Briggs Type Indicator tests and read loads on my own type (INFJ here 😀 ), I’ve not had the time to read that much into other types. Since INFJ’s are the rarest, even if my characters do share my attributes and interests, I don’t think if they were to do the test, they would come out so.

I’d say Cathy’s a Ravenclaw. She’s not brave enough for a Gryffindor, is too frank to be a Hufflepuff, and honestly, I see very few traits of hers as Slytherin-y. She aspires to not aspire.

  1. Are they more likely to worry about present problems, or freak out about the unknown future?

Well, Cathy would consider the two irreparably linked – her present problems are the small cogs in the machine of the unknown future; if there are present issues, that means that the future is not going to be set out the way she would like it to be.

  1. What is their favourite drink?

Your average Google stock photo

Tea. Definitely. Just your average India Leaf tea, though she was recently introduced to lemon Green tea, and she rather liked it.

  1. What is their favourite colour? Least favourite?

Her favourite colour is a rich maroon or burgundy. She likes the rich reds that can be transformed to taffeta fabrics. Her least favourite colour…I’d say that would be black, simply because it lacks texture and the potential to see other colours through it.

  1. What is a book that changed their life?

Wow. Now that’s a loaded question. I mean, I don’t have a favourite book, and – as Cait herself would say – I am a feelingless Vulcan, whose life has very rarely been changed by a single book, so I don’t know where to start with Cathy. What springs to mind would be the first book she translated: a series of poems in elegiac couplets by Catullus, one of a group of Roman writers known as the ‘new poets’. She would’ve been inspired by the way the poetry is clever and full of imagery – yet, also is poetic in the sense that it does not stick to the poetic boundaries English is forced to.

What about you? Are you in the deep depths of editing at the moment, or have you just started making a new book baby? Let’s chat 😀

HOUR OF MISCHIEF Review

(What’s this? Another review? Well, I read on the way to work, okay.)

InstagramCapture_9fbdf9dc-316c-4081-88fd-53253677edb7_jpg

Born in a whorehouse in the slums of Fortuna and burdened with a prosthetic arm, seventeen-year-old JANET REDSTONE doesn’t think she owes the Clockwork Gods anything—which is why she makes a living stealing from their temples. But when she lands her team in prison, making a pact with the God of Mischief, ITAZURA, is the only way to right her wrongs and free her friends.

Janet doesn’t trust Itazura as far as she can punch him, but with her soul in his hands, she has no choice but to do what he says. The clockwork gods and the bad-tempered elder gods of the ancient past are locked in a game of cat and mouse and the human realms are caught in the middle. If Janet can’t somehow convince the gods to step in a save the world, humanity is in an abyss of trouble.

Using her unconventional wits, an impressive tolerance to alcohol, and a strong right hook, Janet has to convince the gods that humanity is worth saving. Unfortunately, it’s a lot more difficult to stop an apocalypse when you’re slowly being driven crazy by the Lord of Mischief, especially when he starts growing on you.

(Also, yay, an excuse to use Steampunk gifs!)

Author Aimee Hydman is someone I admire, having acquired an agent and deal during college/university. So, I was eager to get my teeth into her debut, particularly as it’s Steampunk right off the bat.

It’s hard for me to pick a favourite element of the book. The setting was luscious but not over-described – Fortuna, Janet’s home city lies on part of a clock-shaped world. I am rather jealous, actually, of how Hyndman incorporated her world-building into the Steampunk aesthetic of the novel and explained through it the human characters’ relationship with the clockwork gods.

Speaking of the characters, they were also engaging. Janet’s the kind of spunky heroine that my teen MC, Agnetha, would hate and be best friends with. It wad great to have the book narrated by Janet; she makes a number of questionable decisions – yet, one understands her reasoning and even supports her. Not only because we see it through her eyes, but also because she is fearlessly faithful to her friends.

Speaking of which, I was sad we didn’t get to see more of the Pendulum Thieves, but, again in retrospect that the is a book1, My favourite character, however, was the goddess Laetatia. Despite being world-weary and as assertive as Janet, she is a foil to Janet with her femininity and elegance. She combines Janet’s strong qualities with a softness that makes her an appropriate companion/big sister figure in the novel.

There was also a lot of set up for later, with hints of foreshadowing here and there that I appreciated. Got to love some subtle foreshadowing (though, Shakespeare does tend to ram it in your face…). Granted, I didn’t realise this was the first of a (potential) series until the final chapter, so I was expecting the mysterious elements to be wrapped up by the end. Okay, I’ll admit that I was a little disappointed they weren’t, but at the same time, I liked that they weren’t all solved. Hyndman avoided rushing the reveals with some deus ex machina explanation or the old “as you know, Fred…” trope. (You can tell I’ve been editing the end of my first-draft novel, cant you? *grin*)

I planned not to be interested in any potential sequels (I have too many books on my to-read list to be involved with series at the moment) but the cliff-hanger-esque feeling to the ending meant that there are so many questions still unanswered in the novel that I want to snatch up the sequel if it’s published.

4 Steampunk pieces out of 5.

TableClock_AlexB2

I took a star off for the typos I noticed. I consider this not the fault of the author but of the editor, who I would expect to have caught these things before publishing, and whilst I do admire Curiosity Quills Press, I have heard of a few editorial problems from them.

Would I recommend the YA Steampunk novel? Absolutely. It’s an adventurous quick read with a take-no-trouble-from-anyone heroine and, yes, a somewhat dreamy god who’d rather give you a trick than be a hero.

~

About the author:

Aimee Hyndman, by Aimee HyndmanAimee Hyndman has been writing ever since her toddler fingers could grasp a pencil. A lover of all things speculative fiction, she spent many a night penning the beginnings of novels that would never see the light of day. Now attending college in Iowa, double majoring in Creative writing and English, she has clearly never lost her love of the craft.

When not writing and avoiding her school work, Aimee enjoys reading, singing, and acting at her school’s theater department. She is also a lover of anime and all things Disney.

Her area of specialty is fantasy of all sorts but she dabbles in many genres— whatever she feels compelled to write at the moment. The plot bunnies are never ending but, luckily, so are the words!

 

I Am The Most 3D Character I Know.

Don’t be surprised there’s no Photo of the Week today/yesterday*. I was working on my dissertation; I was in my department since two and only got home at 8. Anyway, I was talking to someone earlier, and with my answers to their questions, I realised that my different motives and personalities would seem to pull me different ways, both the quirky and the serious.

For starters, one would think that I would ‘fangirl’ over characters, ‘ship them mercilessly, and try and pally with them, but I’m actually what I would call a ‘cold reader’. I can empathise, but I rarely feel strongly for them. At least, in books. in films, it’s easier to fall for relationships between characters. One day, I might write a post considering that. (See Miriam Joy’s commentary)

Invite me swimming and I will gush yes, but the sports I’ve been doing are Quidditch and Swing Dance – and, through that, I suppose (at least in part) my interest in vintage fashion has arisen.

Following that, I’m the studious type, but I love dressing up. Sure, I can be found most days in comfy hoodies and black trousers, but give me time and the right weather, and I can be found in a petticoat, a swing dress, a headband. Or, if the mood suits, a corset and a host of accessories. And, to match that, you’ll find me in vintage makeup and/or hair.

I count myself as a performer, with a passion in music. I used to drum and write music and lyrics, but those days… I still weekly spend three hours as a soprano at chamber choir, three hours of taught singing – and if one were to add to that the casual singing and listening to music I do. The surrounding myself with music and life.

And writing. Writing is a BIG (caps for emphasis) part of my life, something I think about every day. Not including my writing of academic papers or non-fiction (could one consider Twitter as a form of writing? For another post, maybe…), I write creative writing and edit just as much. I try and go to the creative writing group at uni every week. When someone asks what do you do? I answer first that I’m a student, and second that I moonlight as a writer. I have to. I am tied to writing and my characters now, having spent so long with them. To let them go would almost be murder.

Don’t forget, though, I also do a lot for my faith. I go to Mass twice a week, I sing in the choir, I try and go to Rosary, I host food and discussion of faith every week. I will definitely say that me, as a character, is defined by my faith for what I do.

There are so many facets, even more than those which I talk about here. I could bore myself alone by going on. My degree is important, too, yet I am also interested in academics beyond my degree, such as Linguistics. I am interested in people (which, one could argue, comes from and/or relates to my creative writing) and thus my studies have nearly always been based this way. I was more language-based for my GCSEs than world-based (eg. history, geography). For my A-Levels, I again looked to essays and people: Psychology, Latin (which included Latin literature comprehension, yes in Latin), Religious Studies, Theatre Studies, Physics (which, agreed, breaks the mould, but one must consider the aliens’ feelings, too 😉 ).

I also write this blog. Sometimes.

All in all, it adds up to me, a complete figure that fiction cannot describe. These interests link and lead to others. Can writers craft characters with so many facets; how can one aptly write a character who had a past interest (for instance of my ice skating years) that in no way matches up with their present self and would not need to be relayed through the story?

*As if in show of how hectic life is, I managed to fail to post this the Mon I planned to.

Beautiful People: The Resolutions Edition

Hello, blogosphere. 🙂 Today, I’m linking up with Cait and Sky’s beautiful monthly linkup Beautiful People. And this month it’s about the authors – new year, new goals (supposedly). So I guess that makes me a Beautiful Person.

10928109_595959117172101_1450331761_n

  1. What were your writing achievements last year?

I culled and rewrote so many darhlings… I got some industry interest in my novel. I gave two talks to my creative writing group: one about blogging – the other about tradition publishing and querying. I wrote a 16,000-word short contemporary romance. I wrote about 6,000 words of a Steampunk novella. I wrote about 45,000 words and completed a Steampunk novella for Camp NaNo July, then edited some of it.

I did a lot of research.

  1. Tell us about your top priority writing project for this year.

Editing, I think. Editing my novel. Editing my novella. Doing some subbing. Tell you? Okay, the premise of my novella, codenamed ASB303:

It’s 1870 and Lady Summer is two months away from completing her MA dissertation study of a brain, kept animated by a jar of its neural fluid. When she stumbles upon an activating tesla MRI machine during some of her night-research, however, Summer is shocked to find her brain hooked up to it. And worse—the monster that forms from it, threatening to destroy the Psychobiology department’s reputation, the lives of the many university students in campus over autumn, and Summer’s precious brain dissertation.

  1. List 5 areas you’d like to work the hardest to improve this year.

Spend more focused editing time. Listen to more science TED talks/podcasts instead of watching YouTube. Stick to, and be inspired by, a motivational star-chart. Work on more compelling character motivations in scenes, chapters, and arcs. Work on improving first- and early-draft pacing.

  1. Are you participating in any writing challenges?

I’ll do Camp NaNoWriMo in July like I do every year, but I don’t have a specific plan just yet. I have several book ideas, but I’m not pushing them out into the open until I actually have time to write. So I’m not sure which yet I’m going to focus on, whether novel or novella, fantasy or contemporary.

  1. What’s your critique partner/beta reader situation like and do you have plans to expand this year?

I always have plans to expand, but, when it comes to Critique Partners, my eyes are bigger than my stomach. That is, I took on two new Critique Partners last year and managed to crit some of their stuff without editing my own to send to them; and vice versa. Adding to that, that I neglected my first CP (who got a two-book deal last year!), I’ve decided that I can’t take on any others without neglecting one (or more) arm of what I already have.

  1. Do you have plans to read any writer-related books this year? Or are there specific books you want to read for research?

No, I don’t yet have any plans to read any writing/skill books. I’ve got a couple of Linguistics books and articles to read for uni research, as I will have expectantly for the next three months alongside my textbooks.

  1. Pick one character you want to get to know better, and how are you going to achieve this?

I’d love to learn more about the MC of my novel’s family, Mr. and Mrs. Masters and their two elder daughters and son. I’ve extensively explored the family history of my other MC/the love interest, but this is because the Costellos’ money makes them more inclined to scandal and foul behaviour. Their morals are twisted by societal success and boasting. Plus, they are more crooked by nature than the Masters who are only seeking to elevate their daughters into better society. The irony!

How do I plan to go about it? Vignettes and scenes. And quite a bit of daydreaming. That always works.

  1. Do you plan to edit or query, and what’s your plan of attack?

I am currently editing my main novel and going through the rounds with it already, and, although I don’t expect to get my quota in every month with my uni expectations, I hope to continue working on it with similar rhythm. On the other hand, I have a little pile of books waiting to be edited – my YA contemporary murder mystery; my Steampunk novella (which is chapter-by-chapter slowly going through my Beta).

  1. Toni Morrison once said, “If there’s a book that you want to read, but it hasn’t been written yet, then you must write it.”  What are the books that you want to see more of, and what “holes” do you think need filling in the literary world?

Ooh, difficult question. Love that quote, though. I guess I’d like to see more unusual/fantasy university-set fiction. I mean, I’m biased because the aforementioned Steampunk novella is a fantasy set in a fictitious English university town, cogs and all. I have no objection to the boarding school novel, but we always see those, with their narrow halls and fixed staff-set, and we rarely see the insides of universities, where it takes one 30 minutes to get from lecture to lecture and one gets lost in a single building. Or only for contemporary romance.

  1. What do you hope to have achieved by the end of 2016?

It’s really difficult to say at this stage. Well, no, it’s not, but few of my current wishlist achievements are writing/work related: graduate with a good grade, get healthy, spend a good summer with my darling partner, start post-graduate plans – whatever they end up being. Oh, and write something, read more, and get an agent.

WP_20151205_001

A motivational star-chart (example from November).

That’s me done, then. Now I’m off to read some others in the linky. *waves and skips off*

Beautiful People: the Friendship Edition

For this month’s Beautiful People (hosted by Cait and Sky), I’m going to look into the friendship between two characters (the main characters, in fact) of mine in my work-in-progress short. Kazia and Joel haven’t known each other for so long, but they soon become firm friends, and a bit more…

10928109_595959117172101_1450331761_n

  1. How long have they known each other, and how close are they?

By the end of the short story, they’ve known each other for a few months, five or so—but seeing as they meet at the beginning, their knowledge about each other is limited, as it should be. I’m writing a romance, not a stalker thriller.

Throughout the short, they get closer and closer mentally, but physically, they are miles apart so relish time spent physically in each other’s company.

  1. What’s their earliest memory of being best friends?

Of being close? Difficult to say. I think it finally clicks that they rely a lot on each other the closer to the climax of the story—but telling you about that would be spoilers, as their emotional interactions make them better friends.

  1. Do they fight? How long do they typically fight for?

I wouldn’t say they fight for a temporal length of time. It’s more that they get miffed at each other frequently and have arguments that are short, to-the-point, but resolve said arguments on the spot, or within a few hours of thought and snapped discussion.

  1. Are their personalities similar or do they complement each other?

They both have a quirky side, which is what drew them to each other, but, fundamentally, their personalities are different. Kazia is studious and focused on her studies and animal anatomy as a passion, whilst Joel is less academically inclined, but good with his hands. Not a euphemism.

He is good at building things, okay? Even if he doesn’t quite know where he wants his career or future to go—whereas Kazia is happy to stay in research.

  1. Who is the leader of their friendship (if anyone)?

Kazia and Joel have similar temperaments in terms of how they interact around each other. I’d say that they both lead different parts of their friendship and how they get to know each other. Or, if one is the more socially submissive, I’d say it’s Joel, as he does not have as much confidence as Kazia.

  1. Do they have any secrets from each other?

Yes, many. Most because they’re afraid of upsetting each other with facts that would probably be worked out in the time it would take them to discuss what would happen. Nevertheless, they keep those secrets and pretend everything is fine.

  1. How well do they know each other’s quirks and habits?

Not very well, to be honest. However, that is what I, as a reader, would expect; because they have not known each other for so long, it follows that there would still be a lot for them to know about each other beyond the confines of 10-ish-thousand words.

  1. What kind of things do they like to do together?

They like to go to role-playing events, and they Skype a lot (trust me, I know some technophobes who prefer to talk via phone, so being able to use an application-based conversation device is a hobby). I can imagine that they would play board or card games together, as neither are very competitive, but I can also imagine that Kazia would be confused as to all of these new boardgames that have come from nowhere. She may be geeky, but only when it comes to biology. Her nerd radar is sufficiently lacking compared to Joel’s.

  1. Describe each character’s fashion style (use pictures if you’d like!) How are their styles different/similar?

dress1In their daily life, both Joel and Kazia dress quire casually – unlike his brother, Joel isn’t much of a ‘macho’ football playing guy, so doesn’t have any jerseys or leave his kickers hanging around his den. Instead, it’s just t-shirts. Kazia’s the same. She likes t-shirts because she doesn’t see the point in dressing up for a normal day. She is a jeans-wearing sort of person.

Being role-players, they also have their own style of outfits for the weekend: Kazia went for a classical NeoVictorian lady’s day wear of what Joel calls a ‘teapot skirt’ (no manners, the man!) and a blouse. Joel tends to wear two- or three-piece suits, with a particular emphasis on the waistcoat.

  1. How would their lives be different without each other?
941516_10200285012861954_6767579_n2

Lovingly beheaded

I think they both would have less direction in their lives if they hadn’t met each other. Through Joel, Kazia worked out where she wants to study for her PHD; through Kazia and her academic determination, Joel realised that he needed to get his life together a bit more and look towards a career rather than just a job.

That’s it from me for this month! Check out the rest of the hop to see what the other writers have been up to with their characters.

Beautiful People: Lady Chronaire

Beautiful People this month is focused on summery questions. Ahem. Which is apt for the pouring rain we’re having in Scotland today. Since I’ve just finished my novella for Camp NaNoWriMo (with its Pinterest board), I’m going to talk about my protagonist, somewhat ironically named Summer.

PAPERFURY

  1. What’s their favourite ice cream flavour?

Summer doesn’t tend to have the money to indulge in gelato, but if she did, she would have a lemon or melon sorbet, something light that also acts as a palette cleanser.

  1. Your character is getting ready for a night out. Where are they going? What are they wearing? Who will they be with?

10698716_10202724826224255_6284911300705838001_nIf Summer were invited to a socialite ball, she would happily accept regardless of the host, taking her lover if he were not already on a mission in the skies. Of course, the dress code is formal, and Summer has an array of formal gear, though she tends towards practical-formal rather than poofy dress and extended bustle dresses. Her style of outfit would be a dark green or emerald floor-length dress with a corset (underbust or overbust) in likely brown or silver, and her heirloom cairngorm around her neck. Paired with these would be a pair of kid-boots – and elbow-length gloves, depending on whose ball it would be. These kind of balls would be held in the centre of the New Berkshire city, where there is a city hall and a cathedral.

  1. Look at your character’s feet. Describe what you see there. Do they wear dress shoes, gym shoes, or none at all? Are they in socks that are ratty and full of holes? What do they consider comfortable and what do they consider agony?

Summer wears the typical kid-boots of the Victorian age with stockings, though you wouldn’t see that if you looked down to the layers. The kind of shoes she’d consider uncomfortable would be, hypothetically, the types of modern shoes, like trainers or Converses, which she’d find restrictive. In terms of Victorian shoes, whilst indoor heels are enough for hiding one’s ankles whilst indoors, they are not exactly practical outdoors.

Victorian Shoes:  Soft kid side-lace boots were worn outdoors. While indoors, Victorian ladies wore heeled flat shoes or slippers. These ivory kid boots, a style of Victorian shoes, have a Philadelphia label.

Gorgeous!

  1. Do they have any birthmark or scars? Where are they and how did they get them?

No, Summer has no birthmarks or scars (or tattoos) of note. She has other quirks of appearance.

  1. What kind of music do they listen to? Does it change depending on their mood or is it always consistent? (Feel free to share samples!)

Summer has no access to a gramophone, so when she hears music it is often from the same source However, her tastes in music tend to be pretty consistent – she likes the classical music, rather than alternative music sources. Though, she has said to have a secret liking for Steam Powered Giraffe. 😉

  1. Do they have any musical talent? Play an instrument? How’s their singing voice?

Whilst Summer does not actively play an instrument – simply because she has not the time due to work and social commitments – she suffered the chore of piano-forte lessons at the age of three. She persevered, but had little natural skill, and gave it up aged eight.

  1. What kind of book would you catch them reading?
Peaceful Reading by Fernand Toussaint (1873-1955)

Peaceful Reading by Fernand Toussaint (1873)

As much as Summer appreciates fictional books, she’s not a bookworm bookworm, and is more likely to be found with a parchment report in her hands from the library or her fellow Psychobiologists than a tome. On that front, the sorts of research she’d find from the further past (eg. Darwin’s Origin of the Species) she’d find in battered books and put on her reading goggles and spread the book across her dining room table.

  1. How would they spend their summers (or their holidays)?

Well, her current summer is spent in the Psychobiology lab on campus, researching and finishing her report for her Masters degree of Brain Study. However, in previous summers or holidays when she hasn’t been working in the department, Summer has taken to the skies with her beloved. She doesn’t love airships, but if she has The Sergeant holding her, she feels less sky-sick. She rarely returns to the town in which she grew up.

  1. It’s Saturday at noon. What is your character doing? Give details. Ex. If they’re eating breakfast, what’s on the menu? Are they hiking, shopping, lazing around?

Saturday would most likely be a day off for Summer, so she would be spending time watering the plants at the Horticulture building. If not, she would be expecting her Sergeant at the docking bay or drinking sherry with him in a variety of locals. She doesn’t advocate lazing, but it is nice to not have immediate reports and research to complete.

  1. Is there anything your character wants to be free of?

Her past. Cliché, I know, but Summer never got along with her stepmother or her blunt father, so thinking of her childhood often leaves her in shadow. Although it may help her, she is desperate to forget that she comes from a family of non-academics, by which she is embarrassed.

*

So, that was my Beautiful People post for this month. I had written a bio for Summer a while ago, but have never got around to posting it, so this is a little snippet of how she would act in certain circumstances. What about you? Have you ever written an extended bio for a character? Why?

Beautiful People: Cathy’s Parents

Let’s talk about Cathy’s parents.

It’s Beautiful People time again, and this month’s theme is parents/guardians. I’m taking a break from WTCB for now, and besides, last month I talked about Mrs. Costello, the mother of the hero of WTCB, so I’m running on two parents addition, sorry.

The thing about writing [non-YA] Steampunk is that protagonists often don’t have their parents around, and so, there is little we know about them, and little we have as interaction. The protagonist of ‘H’, Cathy, is deliberately aloof at the whereabouts of her parents – though they are not dead – and the ‘voice of reason/irrationality’ is her governess, Miriam. But she is only around at the beginning of the novel. After all, Cathy considers that her parents are still part of her life – in fact, they appear in further instalments of the series – we simply aren’t introduced to them in the first novel. Hence why I thought I’d pay an interest to them here.

Onto the questions.

PAPERFURY

  1. Do they know both their biological parents? Why/why not?

Yup, she grew up with both her parents.

  1. Have they inherited any physical resemblances from their parents?

Cathy has her parents brown hair. She also has her mother’s nose and mouth as soft features. Cathy does resemble her mother quite a bit, but general society has not seen the latter for a while, so they would not be able to compare mother and daughter.

  1. What’s their parental figure(s) dress style? Add pictures if you like!

When they were younger, Cathy’s parents were rather a la mode. They travelled a lot for their work as entomologists, and, as such, were more tanned than pale-skinned Cathy. So…entomologist chic.

  1. Do they share any personality traits with their parental figures? And which do they take after most?

She probably takes after her mother most in terms of personality: both are headstrong and can be brash at times, but both also mean well, particularly when they have love in their hearts. The difference is that Cathy’s mother is concerned with keeping those she loves safe, even if that means wrapping them in cotton wool, whereas Cathy prefers to attack situations head-on for those she loves.

As dearly as Cathy cares for her mother, she gets along with her father better, as he is wittier and reminds her of her crush, Alexander. He also tended to take charge around the household, and this meant that there was less pressure on Cathy to help with housework and such.

  1. Do they get on with their parental figure(s) or do they clash? 

Although her parents are pushy, and at times, Cathy gets upset with them that they have cloistered her and kept her from exploring and stress her education, she doesn’t clash with either of them. In fact, I’d say that Cathy has had more opinion-butting moments with her governess Miriam.

  1. If they had to describe their parental figure(s) in one word, what would it be?

Disturbed. 😮

  1. How has their parental figure(s) helped them most in their life?

Ironically, I suppose, Cathy’s parents entertained her interest for adventure by being absent on work. They kept her behind when they travelled to places like the Andes and the Amazon. On the other hand, when he was around, her father, before he hired a governess, helped her understand different species of bug, butterfly, and arachnid (though, Cathy always flinched at the latter). He taught her the maths he knew, and both parents taught her proper Lady’s English and geography. These sorts of things gave Cathy a headstart in her education, just as reading to one’s children aids their unconscious and conscious acquisition of knowledge.

  1. What was their biggest fight with their parental figure(s)?

About her education, definitely. Cathy wanted to travel with them once she turned sixteen to see the kinds of exploration and expeditions they were doing. However, her father and mother wanted her to stay with her governess and complete her education to be a young lady worthy of marriage, despite Cathy’s already-blooming crush on Alexander.

  1. Tracing back the family tree, what nationalities are in their ancestry?

Cathy’s father’s ancestry can be traced back to the first settlers on the place we now call England, so the Anglo-Viking heritage. Her mother, however, has mixed blood, having a grandmother who was French and ancestry further in the east, though darker colouring has all but faded.

  1. What’s their favourite memory with their parental figure(s)?

First riding cross-country to Alexander’s parents’ house. Cathy loved to learn to ride, so it was very beneficial for her to make journeys like those from as young as four or five. Her mother used to ride with her, which allowed Cathy to watch the scenery race past, but quickly let her have her own foal, Cacao, who has grown up with her.

Not quite right, but it’s a nice visual point

So, I think I’ve learnt a little more about Cathy’s society and experience of growing up via her parents. Check out the blog hop for more posts about characters’ parents.