June 2017 Wrap Up

Like, did I actually a) blog and b) do a wrap up post?? Blame Cait @ PaperFury for inspiring me. (Photo by Katherine Hinzman) Reading I finished ADAMANT by Emma L Adams. Thoughts/Mini Review? 3 1/2 out of 5 stars. I liked it, and the characters were quirky, but it was a pretty chunky read, … Continue reading June 2017 Wrap Up

Elizabeth Stokoe Talks About Analysing Conversations

Although this TED talk is a year old, I have only just come around to it, and I couldn't not share it. This is fascinating, and exactly what I try and think about when I am writing dialogue. It's also one of the reasons I am drawn to want to understand the pragmatics of Linguistics … Continue reading Elizabeth Stokoe Talks About Analysing Conversations

Freudian Time Slip

Just something to think about for your Thursday. Does linguistic variation over time and the way society’s use of language changes it (sociolinguistics) stem from subconscious – and/or extraterrestrial – formation of what it means to be human?

Davetopia

We all, I suspect, have words and phrases we repeatedly remember differently from the majority, whether in spelling or meaning. Often, they seem to stem from mere rote, such as my mistyping ‘from’ as ‘form’ but not vice versa because of a slight difference in the speed my fingers move when touch-typing. But sometimes they seem more meaningful.

Take the case of the anthropic principle: a series of philosophical considerations in astrophysics that observations of the physical universe must be compatible with the observer. While both the literature and experts (as far as I know) apply the correct name, I have noticed a significant minority of interested laypeople call it the anthropomorphic principle.

Assuming from context it is not a deliberate reference to a theological term that received some mention in the mid-1800s, it would be easy to dismiss the confusion as stemming from ‘anthropomorphic’ being a much more common…

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